5 Monk Fruit Seeds-1149B

Regular price $ 2.50

**GROWN ON OUR FARM HERE IN TENNESSEE**

** WORLD'S SWEETEST ** MONK FRUIT **

PhotoA deliciously sweet super-fruit.

Monk fruit is packed with healthy antioxidants and vitamins, but what makes this fruit really special is its great-tasting, all-natural sweetness. Wondering how can that be? It’s simple. Monk fruit’s amazing sweetness comes from unique, naturally occurring antioxidants which have a delicious sweet taste, but without the calories of sugar. Natural, Non-calorie sweetness from fruit - what could be better than that?
Perennial vine (zone 6a)
The plant is cultivated for its fruit, used for cooling drinks and in traditional Chinese medicine. The fruit extract is nearly 300 times sweeter than sugar and has been used as a natural low-calorie sweetener in China for nearly a millennium to treat diabetes and obesity.

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Siraitia grosvenorii is an herbaceous perennial vine native to southern China and northern Thailand. The plant is best known for its fruit, commonly called luo han guo/luo han kuo (from the Chinese luóhàn guǒ, simplified Chinese: 罗汉果; traditional Chinese: 羅漢果 sometimes printed lohoguo in Hong Kong]), la han qua (from Vietnamese la hán quả), arhat fruit, Buddha fruit, or monk fruit. The fruit is one of several that have been called longevity fruit] The species was named in honor of Gilbert Grosvenor. It belongs to the Cucurbitaceae (gourd) family

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The interior fruit is eaten fresh, and the bitter rind is used to make tea appropriately called luohan guo tea, 罗汉果茶.

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The plant is most prized for its sweet fruits, which are used for medicinal purposes, and as a super sweetener.

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A notification for GRAS status for using monk fruit juice concentrate to sweeten edible products was submitted to the FDA in 2009. No restrictions on consuming the fruit or its extracts were made.

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During the Tang dynasty, Guilin was one of the most important Buddhist retreats containing many temples. The fruit was named after the arhats (Chinese: 羅漢; pinyin: luóhàn), a group of Buddhist monks who, due to their proper way of life and meditation, achieved enlightenment and were said to have been redeemed.

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According to Chinese history, the fruit was first mentioned in the records of the 13th-century monks who used it.

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